Intuit Infuses QuickBooks Software with AI to Help SMBs Manage Cash Flow

Over the past week, as the government has begun lifting restrictions, we have seen many small and medium businesses (SMBs) across Canada reopen their doors and slowly resume operations. However, we’re far from business as usual. SMBs are navigating new regulations and unpredictability, and planning for the future is more important than ever.

To support SMBs through the recovery phase and beyond, today, Intuit QuickBooks Canada launched their new Cash Flow Planner, which infuses QuickBooks’ accounting software with artificial intelligence (AI) to help better predict cash flow positions.

The Cash Flow Planner will help SMBs make informed financial decisions to manage cash flow more effectively, at a time when it is needed more than ever.

“The QuickBooks Cash Flow Planner is a first in the industry in Canada,” said Melika Hope, Head of Product at Intuit QuickBooks Canada. “Our AI sees transactions across the platform, looking at cash flow, expenses and invoices pending.”

Unprecedented Times

The impact of COVID-19 and the restrictions placed on business activity have been felt deeply by the SMB community. According to a recent study done by CIBC, 81% of Canadian small business owners’ operations have been negatively impacted by COVID-19, and 32% worry about the viability of their business over the next year.

These struggles are not isolated to this moment in time. Prior to the pandemic, Canadian small businesses were already struggling with their cash flow. 53% said they have experienced cash flow problems in the past.

In response to this, the Cash Flow Planner is an innovative digital solution, powered by AI, that will help SMBs and their accounting professionals analyze their current cash situation and develop a forecast to identify the best ways to manage cash flow.

This analysis looks at both money coming into the business and money being spent, using the data in QuickBooks to model future scenarios and recommend courses of action.

Cash (Flow) is King

Cash flow has, and always will be key to small business success, The Cash Flow Planner is an interactive tool that predicts cash flow over the next 30 and 90-days in real time. It gives users a variety of options to avoid cash problems, including when they should pay bills, if their cashflow position is strong enough to make payroll and whether they can afford new expenses.

It also provides the option to play with different scenarios to help predict cash flow positions and make more financially savvy decisions, which will be vitally important for SMBs as they slowly emerge from the COVID-19 lockdown.

In addition, the more you use and interact with the Cash Flow Planner, the more it learns, based on users’ previous expenses and incomes entered on the QuickBooks platform.

Backing SMBs, Today and Tomorrow

“Many SMBs are fighting to survive. As such, new technology innovations that can take existing data, analyze it and make recommendations in real time, will not just save time, but give small business owners more confidence in their financial abilities,” concludes Hope.

As we move through this next stage of the pandemic, and back towards a new normal; the Cash Flow Planner will support small businesses through every stage of their businesses, to plan for their future.

By predicting recurring money in or out, based on patterns found in users’ bank history, reducing manual inputs and in return, saving time, it will give small business owners more time to do what they are passionate about for years to come.

Start using the Cash Flow Planner today. Join 5.6 million people and sign-up for QuickBooks for all your small business needs.

>>>Source Article from Intuit Canada Team

CPP Annual Update – 2021

CPP contribution rates, maximums and exemptions 2021

Important notice!

Changes to the rules for deducting Canada Pension Plan (CPP) contributions.

Changes to the rules for deducting Canada Pension Plan (CPP) contributions

In 2012, the rules for deducting CPP contributions changed. These changes do not affect the salary of an employee working in Quebec or an employee who is considered to be disabled under the CPP or QPP, nor do they affect the salary and wages of a person who has reached 70 years of age.

Services and information
YearMaximum annual pensionable earningsBasic exemption amountMaximum contributory earningsEmployee and employer contribution rate (%)Maximum annual employee and employer contributionMaximum annual self-employed contribution
2021$61,600$3,500$58,1005.45$3,166.45$6,332.90
2020$58,700$3,500$55,2005.25$2,898.00$5,796.00
2019$57,400$3,500
$53,9005.10$2,748.90$5,497.80
2018 $55,900$3,500$52,4004.95$2,593.80$5,187.60
2017$55,300$3,500$51,8004.95$2,564.10$5,128.20
2016$54,900$3,500$51,4004.95$2,544.30$5,088.60
2015$53,600$3,500$50,1004.95$2,479.95$4,959.90
2014$52,500$3,500$49,0004.95$2,425.50$4,851.00
2013$51,100$3,500$47,6004.95$2,356.20$4,712.40
2012$50,100$3,500$46,6004.95$2,306.70$4,613.40
2011$48,300$3,500$44,8004.95$2,217.60$4,435.20
2010$47,200$3,500$43,7004.95$2,163.15$4,326.30

The above table is available in comma-separated value (CSV) format at the following link: 

  • 2000 to 2009 
YearMaximum annual pensionable  earnings Basic exemption amount  Maximum contributory earnings       Employee and       employer contribution   rate (%) Maximum annual employee and employer contribution    Maximum annual   self-employed contribution
2009$46,300$3,500$42,8004.95$2,118.60$4,237.20
2008$44,900$3,500$41,4004.95$2,049.30$4,098.60
2007$43,700$3,500$40,2004.95$1,989.90$3,979.80
2006$42,100$3,500$38,6004.95$1,910.70$3,821.40
2005$41,100$3,500$37,6004.95$1,861.20$3,722.40
2004$40,500$3,500$37,0004.95$1,831.50$3,663.00
2003$39,900$3,500$36,4004.95$1,801.80$3,603.60
2002$39,100$3,500$35,6004.70$1,673.20$3,346.40
2001$38,300$3,500$34,8004.30$1,496.40$2,992.80
2000$37,600$3,500$34,1003.90$1,329.90$2,659.80
  •  1990 to 1999 
YearMaximum annual pensionable  earnings Basic exemption amount  Maximum contributory earnings      Employee and       employer contribution   rate (%)Maximum annual employee and employer contribution    Maximum annual   self-employed contribution
1999 $37,400$3,500$33,9003.50$1,186.50$2,373.00
1998 $36,900$3,500$33,4003.20$1,068.80$2,137.60
1997 $35,800$3,500$32,300     2.925 *$   944.78$1,889.55
1996 $35,400$3,500$31,9002.80$   893.20$1,786.40
1995 $34,900$3,400$31,5002.70$   850.50$1,701.00
1994 $34,400$3,400$31,0002.60$   806.00$1,612.00
1993 $33,400$3,300$30,1002.50$   752.50$1,505.00
1992 $32,200$3,200$29,0002.40$   696.00$1,392.00
1991 $30,500$3,000$27,5002.30$   632.50$1,265.00
1990 $28,900$2,800$26,1002.20$   574.20$1,148.40

Footnote * For 1997, the CPP rate was adjusted to 3.0% with a payment on filing a return (max. $969). 

  • 1980 to 1989 
YearMaximum annual pensionable  earnings Basic exemption amount  Maximum contributory earnings        Employee and       employer contribution   rate (%)Maximum annual employee and employer contribution    Maximum annual   self-employed contribution
1989 $27,700$2,700$25,0002.10$525.00$1,050.00
1988 $26,500$2,600$23,9002.00$478.00$   956.00
1987 $25,900$2,500$23,4001.90$444.60$   889.20
1986 $25,800$2,500$23,3001.80$419.40$   838.80
1985 $23,400$2,300$21,1001.80$379.80$   759.60
1984 $20,800$2,000$18,8001.80$338.40$   676.80
1983 $18,500$1,800$16,7001.80$300.60$   601.20
1982 $16,500$1,600$14,9001.80$268.20$   536.40
1981 $14,700$1,400$13,3001.80$239.40$   478.80
1980 $13,100$1,300$11,8001.80$212.10$   424.80
  • 1970 to 1979 
YearMaximum annual pensionable  earnings Basic exemption amountMaximum contributory earnings      Employee and       employer contribution   rate (%)Maximum annual employee and employer contribution     Maximum annual   self-employed contribution
1979$11,700   $1,100$10,6001.80 $190.80$381.60
1978$10,400   $1,000$  9,4001.80 $169.20$338.40
1977$  9,300   $   900$  8,4001.80 $151.20$302.40
1976$  8,300   $   800$  7,5001.80 $135.00$270.00
1975$  7,400   $   700$  6,7001.80 $120.60$241.20
1974$  6,600   $   700$  5,9001.80 $106.20$212.40
1973$  5,600   $   600$  5,0001.80 $  90.00$180.00
1972$  5,500   $   600$  4,9001.80 $  88.20$176.40
1971$  5,400   $   600$  4,8001.80 $  86.40$172.80
1970$  5,300   $   600$  4,7001.80 $  84.60$169.20
  • 1966 to 1969
YearMaximum annual pensionable  earnings Basic exemption amountMaximum contributory earnings      Employee and       employer contribution   rate (%)Maximum annual employee and employer contribution     Maximum annual   self-employed contribution
1969$5,200$600
$4,6001.80$82.80$165.60
1968$5,100$600$4,5001.80$81.00$162.00
1967$5,000$600$4,4001.80$79.20$158.40
1966
$5,000$600$4,4001.80$79.20$158.40

Related topics

WCB Changes 2021 – Part 2: Annual Returns

Annual returns

Reporting the assessable earnings paid to your workers for the current year and estimate of what you expect to pay in the upcoming year will ensure that you have the correct WCB-Alberta coverage in place. Through filing your annual return, the information you provide will help make sure you are paying the correct premium amount and receiving a fair and accurate invoice.

File your return online

New this year: You will no longer receive an annual return PIN letter in the mail. Just log into myWCB and select file my annual return starting Jan. 1, 2021. It’s that easy!

To sign up, go to myWCB. Click Sign up now and then follow the steps to set up a profile. You will need to select the ‘Account Administrator’ role and answer one of three key fact questions to authenticate your access.

What’s new this year [PDF, 0.29MB]

Resources

WCB Changes – 2021 part 1

Recent changes to the Policies and Information Manual

Date of distribution: January 5, 2021

TRANSMITTAL SHEET No: 01 – 2021 January 5, 2021

WHAT’S CHANGED (Please read the policy documents for complete information).
Please note that policy changes since the last issue are indicated by shaded text or shading in the left margin.

  • Legislative Changes – Bill 47:
    Bill 47, which amends the Workers’ Compensation Act, received royal assent on December 9, 2020. Some amendments are effective January 1, 2021 and have resulted in the following policy changes:
    • Maximum Compensable Earnings (MCE) – Policy 04-01, Part II, Addendum A
      Bill 47 reinstates a cap on MCE and gives WCB the ability to determine this amount through a Board Order. A maximum of $98,700 comes into effect January 1, 2021.
    • Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA) – Policy 04-01, Part II, Application 4
      Bill 47 gives WCB the ability to calculate COLA through a Board Order. Effective January 1, 2021, COLA is calculated based on the change in the Alberta Consumer Price Index for 12 months, ending September 30, less 0.5 per cent. Policy 04-01, Part II, Application 4 has been updated to reflect this change.
    • Presumptive Coverage for Traumatic Psychological Injury – Policy 03-01, Part II, Application 6
      Under Bill 47, effective January 1, 2021, the presumption for traumatic psychological injury no longer applies to all workers, but still applies to correctional officers, emergency dispatchers, firefighters, paramedics, peace officers, or police officers, or any other class of worker prescribed by the regulations. Policy 03-01, Part II, Application 6, has been updated accordingly.
  • Employer Services Policy Review:
    The final stage of a comprehensive review of employer account related policies includes the following substantive changes:
    • adding a business test to Policy 06-01, Part II, Application 2 to determine an individual’s status as either a worker or business owner
    • clarifying how businesses providing support to an industry are classified in Policy 07-01, Part II, Application 1
    In addition to the substantive changes above, a number of non-substantive changes have been made to many of our 06 and 07 policies. These non-substantive policy changes codify current practices and do not impact stakeholders. These changes include such things as updating references in policy, correcting grammatical issues, and adjusting examples to generate a better understanding of the intent of our policies.
  • 2021 Annual Updates:
    • 2021 Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA)
      A number of policies have been revised to reflect the 0.84 per cent COLA that is effective January 1, 2021. These policies are 04-01 – Addendum B, 04-04 – Addendum A, 04-07 – Addendum B, 04-08 – Addenda A and B, 04-10 – Addendum A, and Appendix F.
    • Burial, cremation, and memorial expenses – Policy 04-08, Addendum A
      The maximum allowable amount for burial, cremation, and memorial expenses has been reviewed using methodology approved by the Board of Directors. For 2021, the amount remains unchanged from the amount that was effective January 1, 2020.
    • Maximum Clothing Allowances – Policy 04-07, Addendum A
      The clothing allowance amounts for all six categories have been increased effective January 1, 2021, in accordance with the formula approved by the Board of Directors.
    • Allowance Rates – Policy 04-02, Addendum A
      There were no changes to the amounts as a result of the annual review; therefore, the document is not included in the “Complete list of changed documents,” below.
    • Maximum Compensable Earnings (MCE) and Maximum Assessable Earnings (MAE)
      • For MCE, see Bill 47 changes above.
      • There are no changes to MAE for 2021 – MAE remains at $98,700.
    • 2021 Compensation Tables (Appendix E)

Complete list of changed documents

DocumentOld (remove)New
03-01, GeneralPart II, Application 6Policy 03-01, Part II, Application 6 [PDF, 0.52MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
04-01, Establishing Net EarningsPart II, Application 4Policy 04-01, Part II, Application 4 [PDF, 0.18MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Addendum APolicy 04-01, Part II, Addendum A [PDF, 0.06MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Addendum BPolicy 04-01, Part II, Addendum B [PDF, 0.09MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
04-04, Permanent DisabilityPart II, Addendum APolicy 04-04, Part II, Addendum A [PDF, 0.04MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
04-07, Services for Workers with Severe InjuriesPart II, Addendum APolicy 04-07, Part II, Addendum A [PDF, 0.07MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Addendum BPolicy 04-07, Part II, Addendum B [PDF, 0.03MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
04-08, FatalitiesPart II, Addendum APolicy 04-08, Part II, Addendum A [PDF, 0.19MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Addendum BPolicy 04-08, Part II, Addendum B [PDF, 0.12MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
04-10, Other Home ServicesPart II, Addendum APolicy 04-10, Part II, Addendum A [PDF, 0.06MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
06-01, Employers and WorkersPart IPolicy 06-01, Part I [PDF, 0.26MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 1Policy 06-01, Part II, Application 1 [PDF, 0.18MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 2Policy 06-01, Part II, Application 2 [PDF, 0.37MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 3Policy 06-01, Part II, Application 3 [PDF, 0.31MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 4Policy 06-01, Part II, Application 4 [PDF, 0.18MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 5Policy 06-01, Part II, Application 5 [PDF, 0.23MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
06-02, Optional CoveragePart IPolicy 06-02, Part I [PDF, 0.28MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 1Policy 06-02, Part II, Application 1 [PDF, 0.25MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 2Policy 06-02, Part II, Application 2 [PDF, 0.33MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
06-03, PremiumsPart IPolicy 06-03, Part I [PDF, 0.25MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 1Policy 06-03, Part II, Application 1 [PDF, 0.27MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 2Policy 06-03, Part II, Application 2 [PDF, 0.16MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 3Policy 06-03, Part II, Application 3 [PDF, 0.29MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 5Policy 06-03, Part II, Application 5 [PDF, 0.31MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
07-01, ClassificationPart IPolicy 07-01, Part I [PDF, 0.26MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 1Policy 07-01, Part II, Application 1 [PDF, 0.21MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 2Policy 07-01, Part II, Application 2 [PDF, 0.20MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 3Policy 07-01, Part II, Application 3 [PDF, 0.16MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
07-02, Experience RecordsPart IPolicy 07-02, Part I [PDF, 0.26MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 1Policy 07-02, Part II, Application 1 [PDF, 0.18MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 4Policy 07-02, Part II, Application 4 [PDF, 0.27MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 5Policy 07-02, Part II, Application 5 [PDF, 0.15MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 6Policy 07-02, Part II, Application 6 [PDF, 0.16MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
07-03, Financial Administration of Safety Association GrantsPart IPolicy 07-03, Part I [PDF, 0.23MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Part II, Application 1Policy 07-03, Part II, Application 1 [PDF, 0.16MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Appendix E,
Compensation Tables
Entire Document2021 Compensation Tables:
For accidents on or after April 01, 2003 [PDF, 0.20MB]
For accidents on or before March 31, 2003 [PDF, 0.20MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)
Appendix F,
Minimum Permanent Disability Awards & Dependants’ Pensions, with Cost-of-Living Adjustments (COLA), Minimum Personal Coverage, Maximum Annual Assessable Earnings & Maximum Annual Compensable Earnings
Entire DocumentAppendix F [PDF, 0.28MB]
(issue date January 5, 2021)

2021 Policy Transmittals

New 2020 T4 Updates – CRA

New 2020 T4 Reporting Requirements for All Employers

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) announced new reporting requirements for all Canadian employers who issue T4 slips.

In connection with the COVID-19 support programs launched in 2020, employers will have to submit more detailed T4 information, regardless of whether they applied for the various wage subsidy programs or not.

For more information on the new reporting requirements, including the new Form PD27, read our detailed summary.


All Canadian employers who issue a T4 slip, Statement of Remuneration Paid, will have additional reporting requirements for the 2020 calendar year. These additional reporting requirements will help the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) validate payments under the various COVID-19 government programs including:

  • The Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS),
  • The Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB)
  • The Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB)

These new reporting requirements apply to all employers, regardless of whether they applied for these programs or not. 

New T4 Slip Information Codes and Reporting

For the 2020 calendar year, in addition to reporting employment income in Box 14 or Code 71, the new information codes below should be used to report employment income and retroactive payments made in the following periods:

  • Code 57: Employment income – March 15 to May 9
  • Code 58: Employment income – May 10 to July 4
  • Code 59: Employment income – July 5 to August 29
  • Code 60: Employment income – August 30 to September 26

E.g. If you are reporting employment income for the period of April 25 to May 8, payable on May 14, use code 58.

10-percent “Temporary Wage Subsidy” for Employers (TWS) and Form PD27 Requirement

Employers eligible for the TWS are required to complete and submit Form PD27, 10-percent TWS Self Identification Form for Employers, to the CRA. This includes employers who have already claimed the TWS and those who haven’t but still intend to, as well as employers who qualified for both the TWS and the CEWS but elected to claim a TWS of 10 percent or less (including a claim of zero). However, I

  • If an employer elected not to participate in both the CEWS and the TWS, Form PD27 does not need to be filed.
  • Employers who did not qualify for the TWS will also not be required to complete Form PD27. 

The CRA will use this form to reconcile the TWS remittances to the amounts reported on the 2020 T4 Summary. Employers can also instruct the CRA on how they want to apply any balances of TWS available on the Form PD27.

Submission of Form PD27


Click here to fill out the PD27 form right on the Canada.ca’s website

The self-identification form can be submitted online, by mail or fax. The form requires the following information to be provided:

  • Gross remuneration per pay period
  • Income tax, Canada Pension Plan contributions (employer and employee portions), and Employment Insurance premiums (employer and employee portions) deducted from remuneration paid
  • TWS claimed in dollars and as a percentage
  • Total number of eligible employees employed from March 18 to June 19, 2020

There is currently no due date for Form PD27, however employers are encouraged to complete and submit this form as soon as possible to avoid receiving a discrepancy notice from the CRA. 

As the T4 reporting deadline approaches, it is important to be aware of the new reporting obligations associated with the various government wage subsidy programs introduced in response to COVID-19. These new reporting requirements will necessitate employers to spend additional time to gather information and ensure the proper disclosures are made for each employee. Detailed payroll information is needed and if not readily available could be an onerous task.  

For more information on the new T4 reporting requirements or assistance with completing Form PD27, please contact us.